KENDRICK, BRIAN



BRIAN KENDRICK: "Off To See The Wizard (Of Odd)"


By Dr. Abner Mality

Mr. Brian Kendrick is a man who does things his own way. And sometimes his way is pretty different from the norm. Hence, the nickname of "The Wizard of Odd". He lives and works in a world of perpetual violence, yet advocates peace and equilibrium He thrives in a world of unbridled ego by supressing his own. In a profession often dominated by giants, he succeeds despite lack of size. Most of all, he creates his own path instead of following someone else's.

Kendrick is a professional wrestler and you'd be hard pressed to find anyone who has traveled more and done more in 33 years than he has. He's won titles in every promotion he's been in, including WWE and TNA, He's wrestled in more independent federations than you can keep track of and also excelled in overseas tours. He's wrestled as a comical goof, a serious tactician, a tag team specialist, an obnoxious egomaniac and a loopy philosopher...and done well at all of them.

Following a stint as X-division champ in TNA, Brian is now burning up the indies again and feeling better than ever. It seems only a matter of time before this technically gifted free spirit again finds the spotlight. Brian was gracious enough to grant me the interview below and I hope you Wormfriends and rasslin' fans enjoy it!!!




WORMWOOD CHRONICLES: Brian, thanks for the interview! I understand you competed in Japan recently in the Super Juniors Tournament. How did you do and how do you like the Japanese wrestling scene as compared to America?

BRIAN KENDRICK:  Well, I didn't win, but that is just fine with me, nobody has won the Best of the Super Junior Tournament in their first year competing as far as I know. I love the Japanese wrestling scene. It is very different than anywhere else in the world. The technique and athleticism in Japan is in my opinion the finest in the world, the fans are incredibly respectful, and the Japanese culture in general is incredible. They have integrity in everything they do.

WC: You've been very busy since leaving TNA.  Do you feel a lot "freer" now that you're no longer tied to one of the big wrestling companies?

BK:  I do feel freer, which at times can be scary because you don't know what is going to happen next, but I prefer that to being in a rut. I am enjoying being freelance at this time.


WC:  Do you have a particular favorite amongst the indy feds? A place where you feel really challenged?

BK: There are a lot of indy feds that I am enjoying working for right now. FWE in New York is a blast, APEX and DCW in Los Angeles have been great to me. I suppose if I had to pick one though it would be Hoodslam in Oakland because it is unlike anything else in the world of wrestling. I teamed with Drugs Bunny a few months ago and was bitten by a Chupacabra and Street Fighter 2's Blanka all in 1 match, so that experience is something I can't find anywhere else.

WC:  Your team with Paul London was a great success. Any chance of that team being revived on a regular basis?

BK:  I would like to team with Paul much more than I currently do. Paul is a fantastic friend and wrestler.

WC:  Tag team wrestling right now seems to be at an all-time low. Why aren't there any great teams out there anymore? It seems to be a lot of singles wrestlers thrown together instead of real units like the Road Warriors, Dudleys, Midnight Express, etc,

BK:  I think there are still some great tag teams out there, but it seems that the 2 largest companies in the United States are choosing not to focus on tag team wrestling at this time. My hope is that it will have a revival in the near future because in my opinion tag team wrestling is capable of more excitement and a different type of drama than a singles match.

WC: Who was the one guy you most wanted to be like when you broke into the business?

BK: The guys who I wanted to be the most like as a child were Koko B. Ware and the Ultimate Warrior, who I still admire. Since being involved in wrestling the men I strive to emulate are Shawn Michaels, William Regal, and Shinjiro Otani.

WC: Pro wrestling today seems to be pretty much stuck in a rut. Let's say you had the book of a major fed...how would you improve things?

BK:  I would make things chaotic, surprises are what is missing. I would ask each member of the roster to come to my office and give me their best pitch and see what we can come up with. The key though is Chaos.

WC: What would you say is the most satisfying victory of your career?

BK:  The most satisfying victories in my career have to be the ladder match with Paul, because it felt like the WWE had faith in us, and when Kaz Hayashi and myself wrestled Tatsuhito Takaiwa and Tomohiro Ishii for the Jr. Tag Titles in Zero-One, partly because I enjoyed the match and admire all three of those wrestlers but the reason I will always remember it is because 8 years later my neck still feels when Ishii and I landed all our weight with my head first.

WC: You have the reputation of being a "Zen/New Age" kind of character. How does that kind of philosophy fit in the highly competitive world of pro wrestling?



BK:  I feel that pro wrestling is beautiful, it takes dedication to become good at the craft of it, it takes grace and strength, charisma, flair, a connection with an audience, creativity, timing, but the best part of it all to me is that it encourages cooperation or competition. It is a display of athleticism with drama much like ballet.

WC: That kind of philosophy teaches you that the ego is an impediment. Pro wrestling has to be the most egotistical business in the world. How can you get rid of ego and yet succeed as an exciting character?

BK: I think it is possible to shed the ego and still entertain fans by giving the fans what you feel they would enjoy seeing without letting your ego get in the way by convincing you that you are better than something or would look foolish...those are trappings of the ego. A character could be an egomaniac played by a person who has shed the ego because they are playing a role that will help the greater cause.

WC: Is the Eastern philosophy just an interest for you or is it a more serious pursuit?

BK: Philosophies of all origins interest me, but more so than other interests that I enjoy such as the NFL or video games. For me I would rather be figuring out why there are such things as interests is more interesting than any interest, or the thought that there is a place for thought to exist is what I like to chew on.

WC: What spiritual advice would you have for somebody getting into the wrestling business?


BK:  My advice for anybody interested in wrestling or interested in anything at all would be the words of Bashar:  "Follow your excitement."

WC: You also have an interest in conspiracies. The world seems headed to an apocalypse where the ultra-rich control everything. Is this just pure greed...or are there other forces behind it?

BK:. I feel that the universe is one thing, but for it to exist it had to split, but this split is an illusion or in other words the universe is lying to itself. With that being said I feel that what is going on is a struggle between good and evil, weak versus strong. Currently the evil geniuses are ruling the world but for the world to continue to exist it must constantly change before it remembers it is all one, so the good will take over soon once we wake up from the slavery we have agreed to by subscribing to the current monetary system.

WC: Any chance we will see the Spanky character again?

BK:  Sure, to my friends I will always be Spanky, but really the character is just me with a funny name.

WC: I have a feeling you are probably a fan of comics and fantasy. If so, who's your favorite character?

BK:  I am not really a comic guy, but I love Sci-Fi. For now I would say my favorite character is Doc from Back to the Future, because everybody in Star Wars is tied for first and that is not a good answer.

WC: Who would you say your favorite opponent is?

BK: American Dragon and Low Ki are my favorite guys to wrestle.

WC: Any chance of returning to WWE or TNA? Would an ROH run be possible?

BK: Any of those options I am open to, I don't know if any of those companies are currently interested. If I could pick where I could be for now though it would be New Japan Pro Wrestling... to me that is wrestling heaven!

WC: What would you say your least favorite aspect of pro wrestling is?

BK: . TSA, It is a pure crock. It is nonsense, and is based on a lie. I find myself having to calm my self down when in a security line at an airport, I always opt out of the cancer making pecker checker machines so I can get tickled by dudes with badges. They are a part of the illuminati's master plan to usher in 1984 in my opinion.

WC: You are still a pretty young guy. Have you thought about an end to your wrestling career, even if it's years in the future?

BK:  Oh yeah, I have been working on some Cartoons that are on youtube currently called "FunTimeProWrestling" which is a part of a bigger vision I have for what I would like to create, that would have backstage debauchery and live shows. This is what would bring great satisfaction to me if I can bring this idea to life.

WC: Do you prefer working face or heel?

BK: That is a tough one. I really enjoy both and I am glad that on the indies I get to switch it up on a regular basis.

WC: Any last words for the fans?

BK:  Thanks for helping co-create this wonderful world of professional wrestling. Please remember that you are a fan because you loved it at one time, and if possible please hold on to that feeling. Thank you for everything!