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CUTHBERT, LISA


LISA CUTHBERT 

"Hextapes"

By Octopi Mills

Lisa Cuthbert has caught the eye of what could be considered to some as a few influential and note-worthy individuals in the music world. Says CUTHBERT, "Torn between singer-songwriter traditions and art rock experimentation, at a crossroads of cultural permutations and otherworldly sounds, the objective was to focus my energy on creating something, and then to put it out into the universe where it would then make the changes I asked of it."

With comments like these it is not hard to recall the veiled remarks that hint at near monomania which could have came from the mouth of the artist formerly known as Prince, or of the  temporal ingenious one might expect from the common cold.
It is said that the artist has been in the company of many a modern talents' praise; one being the generic folk near relative to the sea skate species known as King Dude- who is greatly hailed in many degenerate circles of late until one finds the support to walk away from such trends.

There is a sound that lumbers and lurks around and mixes many styles about, lending the impression it could be too diverse but as time goes on one can hear a similar formula that might have been present in shoe gaze or pop, never doubting the woman has somewhere heard a metal album all would know. She displays a certain power in her voice that is further enhanced and explored through electronic and by the means of certain effects and experimentation, and this is her strong attribute. The music itself, whatever the song may be, seems to merely be a prop for this attribute, and sounds at times as mere new age parlor tricks whereby the voice outshines the actual lyrical depth and content of any real deeper meaning. Many one word song titles are employed to perhaps a type of mystique to the art. 

The music takes a slow, dark, calm feel that has a tranquil style which gives the vocals the perfect atmosphere to croon and weep; whisper and multi-track themselves into the song at hand. There is a talent to this crooning that bemoans something to behold or be heard and the effects that treat them are used cleverly and to strengthen the depths of her vision. I am not fully sold to the cryptic and viral notions that some have sprang up of late on the music, but it would be interesting for someone to see where this whole thing goes. If there was a Celtic influence, it would have to be in the vocals, which carry merit enough to wonder further on the matter.