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HIMSA


HIMSA- Blowing Shit Up Nationwide

 
By Joe Who?

"Life Sucks And Then You Die" - A quote that may cause some to chuckle, while others may find it hard to grasp or shudder to think about, but the fact of the matter is this quote definitely holds enough truth(s) to be self evident for a good majority of us all. We struggle with trials and tribulations to over come in life, misery loves company, and emotions can run so deep that they cut like a knife.

So it came as no surprise to me when I talked with Seattle metalcore thrashers Himsa, that this same four letter word (pssst..."Life") would come up again. Contrary to popular belief, times are tough for everybody, including bands like Himsa, who have had enough lineup changes to easily grant them entry way into the Guinness Book Of World Records. Although they did suffer through a brief period of setbacks, things would eventually turn around for the band at the start of the new millennium, making it inevitable that all this built up frustration and anger would come to the surface.

As a result the band progressed into a more aggressive, multi-meshed hybrid metal machine,that kicked it up a notch, had no fear, and was ready to take on the world. After enjoying some success and doing some major touring for their milestone 2003 release - "Courting Tragedy And Disaster", the band wasted no time putting together the much anticipated follow up album entitled - "Hail Horror".

I had a chance to talk with 4/5 of the band after catching their headlining show performance in Milwaukee Wisconsin on the "Dirty Black Summer Tour". When this interview was conducted, the new album wasn't out yet, but the band was very optimistic about their future, and were a blast to shoot the shit with. Among the topics we discussed; band history, the new album, seattle, mosh pits, some classic tour stories, and more...enjoy!


Wormwood Chronicles: Well, first off, great to see you guys again. Tonight was my second time seeing you live. The first time I saw a Himsa show was on that Cradle Of Filth tour (Headbanger's Ball Tour 2004 - Cradle Of Filth, Arch Enemy, Bleeding Through, Himsa...) last year in Chicago at House Of Blues. I was stuck in line, and by the time I finally got in, I was only able to catch a grand total of two songs...

Kirby Johnson: (Laughs)...

John Pettibone: I think we only played two songs...

WC: It was real cool to finally see a full set tonight...

JP: Right on, thanks for coming out.

WC: So is this your first headlining tour?

JP: It is...

KJ: Yeah...

JP: Yeah, it's our first headlining tour. It's kind of weird, because last year we did a lot of the opening or second slot kind of stuff, and then we took a break. We wrote and recorded a new record, then were thrown into a headlining spot, and it's just the transition is really weird for us, because we're always the band that gets shit on once in awhile. It's just the way the dynamics of shows goes... you know, with the headlining, sound checks, and whatnot. Being the opener, you're kind of rushed to do things, and rushed to play, but it's awesome all the kids have been coming out, a lot of them saw us on that Headbanger's Ball tour and stuff, so it makes it really worthwhile. I think this is a really strong bill for this tour with; Scars Of Tomorrow, Agony Scene, and The Esoteric. I think the whole package is really awesome, you know, very diverse, that's what we wanted to do with it, and so far it's worked out really really well.


WC: Ok, I have to ask you guys the dreaded band history question, because I have to admit, I just started listening to your music last year. So if you don't mind, could you give me some history on Himsa. When did the band form?

KJ: The guy that did that isn't here. (Laughs)

JP: The only original member in the band is Derek Harn, the bass player, who is absent right now. The band started in late 97, early 98, kind of with a different concept of how it is now, or how you would know the band today. They wanted to kind of cross every genre of aggressive music, and form this monster out of it, and slowly as that band transformed they lost members, and on and on, and on.

So basically the way I look at it, Himsa really got motivated in mid 2000, like when myself and Kirby joined the band, it got a lot more serious. The sound was going in more of a progressive metal direction. All of us are influenced by a lot of the same bands, but we all have our own unique influences that we bring in too. So slowly it happened like that. We got Sammi (Curr - guitar) in the band, we had another drummer before Chad (Davis), Tim Mullen, and you know... came up with our ep - "Death Is Infinite", and that was kind of a little sample of where the band was going, instead of what people knew it as.

From there "Courting Tragedy And Disaster" was recorded, and we've been touring for the last two and a half years on. When the record came out, we lost Tim the drummer durning a tour, and we came home, scrounged around, ultimately got Chad in the band, and at that same time Sammi had personal things going on in his life, and he had to depart from the band. So from what you guys have seen, we had Matt (Wicklund - guitar) added to the band.

From then on, we've been touring on and on and on, right up til now. Matt has left the band, and we got Sammi back, which is awesome. (Laughs) That's how I always looked at it as the band, especially with Courting, I think all of us feed off of each other really well, and we play a lot better. Not to lessen the other guys at all, it's just the way things are, you know? You're stuck in a van with five guys everyday, and it's a really hard way to live. A lot of us have known each other in Seattle through the scene for ten, twelve years, you know, it's awesome. The way how it's gone, and how it is now, especially on this headlining thing, it's been really really comfortable, and it's how it used to be.

WC: You brought up the influences, and I agree, all the different styles incorporated into your sound really makes you guys unique. How did this idea come about to approach the music this way?

Sammi Curr: Before me and Kirby joined the band, a lot of the music was written by another guitar player, Brian Johnson, and it was way more noisey hardcore stuff. Me and Kirby are really more like metal type dudes.I mean we all learned how to play guitar by playing Slayer, Testament, Anthrax, you know, all the metal stuff...

KJ: That's about all we know how to play. (Laughs) ...

SC: So basically when Brian left the band, and me and Kirby had to write the music, it just obviously became metal, because that's what we know how to play. The hardcore is still a little bit there, but that's mostly a Pettibone thing. The music is not really structured in hardcore remotely, it's totally just metal, you know?

JP: It's rooted the way the ethics of the band has gone. We all come from the hardcore scene, but if you could have been in Seattle, and seen how the Seattle scene was, there were so many awesome thrash bands around. It was crazy because, you know, for as long as I've been going to shows, I've been seeing Kirby at shows, and it was crazy, because you'd have a hardcore band, you'd have a thrash band, you'd have a punk band, all on the same bill, and they're all locals, you know what I mean? We had The Accused, we had Forced Entry, Poison Idea in Portland, that has all influenced us through out. We were never separated into one genre, you know what I mean? So I think that reflects on how Seattle is. The music scene is large, and it's influenced by so much. I think it's unique that there's so many styles and influences that come into the band...

SC: There's not one member in this band, that dosen't listen to every genre of music, everybody listens to everything. It goes from fuckin' hip hop to death metal to fuckin' old hardcore bands to you know... whatever. It's just insane. Chad, say something. (All Laughing)

Chad Davis: Tourniquet...

WC: I remember Tourniquet...

CD: Only when I'm driving. They're from here, dude. (Refering to the state of Wisconsin. I'm not sure about the whole band, but I do know that drummer Ted Kirkpatrick lives in Wisconsin... Joe Who?)

WC: I wanted to ask about the recent guitar player shake-up that you spoke about. Why did Matt leave the band? And why did Sammi decide to return?

JP: Matt quit three days before this tour, plain and simple. He kind of dropped it on us. We had been in Denmark recording, kirby and I were over there for a month, Chad did his parts, Derek did his parts, Matt did his parts, you know, everyone did their things. Kirby and I stuck around and finished out the month there, we came home and you know... Matt has a girlfriend now, (Jasmine St. Claire...) and kind of got serious with that(At least 5000 guys got serious with Jasmine before him...she's an accomplished porn queen and also involved in hardcore wrestling--Drooling Mality). Ultimately three days before we left, he was like - I'm not into touring anymore. I don't think he was into the way we tour. It's a hard life style, and not everyone can do it, but it would've been nice to have a little notice. I don't wanna talk shit, but three days before...

KJ: Things did work out for the better, because it was meant to be with this lineup...

JP: Exactly, these two guys (Sammi and Kirby) have been playing together for a really long time, they were in a previous band before this, you know? It's awesome to see them, because you just watch them, and they feed off each other, and it just works. For what we play, that's probably one of the most important things, you know... for the two guitars, the harmonies, and whatnot... just going together and meshing.

So in three days Sammi learned the set, and we were off, he saved it, you know what I mean? It was awesome, because when the tension was there... we work together in a club back home, he had mentioned something, and I was like - Oh, well, it's funny that you ask, yeah, we need a new guitar player, and in three days he was ready.

WC: You mentioned that you put a lot of time, effort, and support into "Courting Tragedy And Disaster", and it was a turning point in Himsa's career. Looking back on this era of the band, what would you say were some highlights?

JP: Everyday is a highlight. I mean, the band is very serious in what we do, but we're really laid back, you know what I
mean? We're not serious about trying to be huge or anything. I think we all feel lucky enough to be able to do this, you know? So everyday is a new adventure. Honestly the biggest things, besides me, these guys shoot fireworks all the time, and try to come up with new concepts of blowing shit up...


KJ: That's been the "theme" for this tour, blowing shit up. All the crazy shit always happens to other bands, luckily it dosen't happen to us, but...

CD: We're kind of connected to it, because we're on tour. We've gotten to tour with some great bands, that's a highlight too. We've made a lot of good friends, you know? So it's cool...

KJ: Yeah, we start out touring with all these bands that we only know vaguely from their music, and then we go out on tour with them, and then they end up being really good friends...

SC: The touring aspect is the highlight of it. There are shows that are good, and there are shows that are bad...

CD: When you get home, you don't really remember shows. You remember playing, you remember hanging out with everybody, and having a good time...

SC: You remember when you were in a band with five other dudes, it's like - Do you remember that one show? No, not really...

CD: Yeah, exactly...

KJ: You remember trying to blow up the hulk with fireworks, shit like that!

JP: I have a highlight, if you wanna hear it...

WC: Yeah, man, go ahead...

JP: It has to do with our old guitar player... We're on a mid drive at night, pulling over to get a motel, all of us are dead tired, and we all get out of the van... Derek was driving. Derek is kind of the lead guy that gets the hotels and stuff. So he was in the van getting situated and ready to get the hotel room. We were all outside, had our bags, and were doing our thing. Kirby had filled a gatorade bottle full of piss...

KJ: (Laughs) 32 ounces...

JP: Yes, and it rolled under the van, and went under the back tire, and it was sitting there. Matt was standing with his bag, right by the tire, and started going through his clothes. Well, Derek pulls forward, and the bottle of piss exploded all over matt in front of all of us, and all you heard was him yelling, and the smell of piss! For me, I don't think I have ever laughed so hard in my life.

To conclude that, Matt goes in to take a shower, and comes back out with the same clothes on! So it made no sense, because he didn't get clean. He still smelled like piss, and he went to sleep with those same piss clothes on!

WC: You guys have a new album coming out soon called "Hail Horror" Can you give us some details about the new album, and how would you compare it to your last album - "Courting Tragedy And Disaster"?

KJ: It's the good parts of Courting, we're building off of that, and finding what works for us. We're really into our aggressive sound, so it's more of that, but it still has a lot of guitared things, you know, like catchy guitar shit, but with still the pissed off aggressive sounds that we thought really worked on the last record. We just left off where we were before, and took another step.

SC: To me it sounds like the record is more defined, whereas Courting was like... since we were going off of the previous record "Death Is Infinite", it wasn't written by anyone that was in the band... I mean, these guys were in the band, (John and Kirby) but they didn't write any of the music. So Courting was really a middle record, it was the hybrid between what it sounds like now, and what it used to sound like before. There are older songs some of us don't even like at all anymore that we wrote because, it was like - Fuck, we have to have the hard corey metal sounding songs, just so we can actually get away with playing this fuckin' Iron Maiden shit that kids aren't going to be into... not that they weren't. (Laughs)

JP: From what kids knew, it's what Himsa was, you know what I mean? So it wasn't such a drastic change from what it started as to the next record...

SC: It's like when Entombed went from death metal to stoner rock, it was weird, Bam - stoner rock. Alright, career change, I guess you're a stoner rock band now. With us Courting was a transitional record, and that's what it turned out to be. The new record, when I listen to it, it sounds like a band. It dosen't sound like a hybrid of shit that was forced together just to make it plausible to have a different sound, you know what I'm saying?

CD: The new record... I like it! (All Laughing) John's vocals are amazing, that's all I gotta say. If you weren't into the vocals on the last one, I hope you give this one a chance, because were gonna sell ya on it, it's good...


JP: And the drumming... the drumming is fuckin' tits!

SC: It is amazing. (Laughs) Fantastic.

WC: I'm intrigued with the album title - "Hail Horror". Is it a concept album based on anyone in particular? Were horror movies inspiration for the album?

JP: No, I took the title from a book that I read called - "I, Lucifer", by an author named Glen Duncan. I don't have any kind of religion that I base myself around, but this book is basically saying that God is giving Lucifer another chance to get into heaven, but he has to live on earth as a mortal for one month, and he has to act like a human, and behave like a human in order to gain entry way into heaven. So it's kind of this funny, comedy of what he does, and he finds out that it's all a lie, they just want to know what he's up to. Lucifer says he's created sexual diseases, volcanoes, tsunamis, and all this shit, and so when he's talking about everything that he's created, his title was like - "Hail Horror". I saw that, and I was like - that's awesome!

From what I had been writing, I felt kind of the same way. Courting was a more personal record for me, just because I hadn't played in a band for five years, and in that five years there had been a lot of torment in my life, and I just needed to get it out, and that was kind of what Courting was. This next record ... I've never ever been a person that's written politically, but it has some political under tones to it, just the way of how we are, the apathy in the world, especially with the war still going on, and you know... yeah, we're out on the road to entertain, but there's some serious negative shit going on in the world, that we always have to think about. One of the songs on the record is called - "Withered", that one really hits home. I'm very close with my family, and it's about being on the road, being away from my family, and losing a loved one. The second day into this tour, my grandfather passed away, and it's still fuckin' with me, you know what I mean? It's just weird, and that's what the song is kind of about, just being on the road, and being away from family, you know? It's just your passion lies in doing this, you know, staying out there, (on tour...) trying to make a living out of this, but there's still the realities of home, and what could happen.

There's a lot more to it on the record and whatnot, but it's just like kirby was saying, it's fuckin' angry, it's aggressive, it's pissed, it's the direction I've always wanted to be in with a band. I've never liked the singing bands, or the melodies, or anything like that, it's just something I don't grasp to, or how I was brought up in a music scene, you know? That's basically how the title came about.

WC: OK, musically speaking, could you explain the creative process of a Himsa album?

KJ: I've got a little eight track with a drum machine. You have ideas that you want to experiment with, like a catalog of riffs. Sometimes a song comes out of them, and hopefully it doesn't suck too bad! (Laughs)

JP: Usually he'll come to practice, and have it, you know what I mean? Basically for both records there was a time frame for writing. They'd write, record stuff down, and come to practice. Chad would lay drums on it, and put his own thing into it, Derek would do the bass, and when there's a finished song, then I'll start writing, and you know, they'll make a tape for me, and I'll start writing off that, but there's still changes within it and whatnot, you know? That's basically how the process goes.

WC: Do you guys ever have trouble interpreting what works for a song?

SC: You can have a song, and two months later it'll be like - Fuck, there's this major kink that's pissing me off. It can be anybody, it could be like - I fuckin' hate this part, Uh, we'll change it, and then you change it, you know? I mean on the Courting record especially there's a few songs that were written at the last minute... two weeks from the deadline. We had to write three songs, so we threw together three songs. One of them people liked...

KJ: One of those songs was "A Girl In Glass", which is kind of like... I don't wanna say "hit" song, but it's a song that people seemed to like.

SC: The main riff was stolen from a song that we wrote in different band together!


KJ: It ended up being all these left over riffs, you know? We were like - Fuck, we need to keep writing some shit, so we put it together...

SC: We just threw a bunch of riffs in the same song, and said - that's a song, there you go, and we recorded it! (Laughs)

WC: As I mentioned earlier, I just started listening to your music last year, and the only album I have by you guys in my collection is "Courting Tragedy And Disaster". I was wondering, will there be any plans to re-issue your older albums at all?

KJ: Nope. That stuff is done...

SC: We'll never play those songs ever again, there's no reason to...

KJ: It doesn't really have anything to do...

SC: With anybody that's in the band...

KJ: Yeah...

SC: Except for Pettibone. (Laughs)

KJ: It's kind of like we stole the name from this other band, and started our own band...

CD: We stole their bass player, and their name, that's about it...

SC: We don't like the songs, we don't want to play them, we even tried to get rid of those songs for so long. It's like, now that they're gone, they're never coming back.

JP: I like "Death Is Infinite", but it's just so different. "Hell Bent And Hammered" is really the closest thing, but that song is so old. We would rather play more newer stuff, it's just time to put things to rest, you know what I mean? Always moving forward, because I can't fuckin' stand when bands I love keep playing old stuff over and over. I wanna hear new shit, you know, they go back and just play the demo song, and it's like - Ugh! my God, this song is fuckin' horrible, this set just went blah! It's crazy, because we do get a lot of kids that never saw us play those songs before, their like - Oh, will you play them? ...

SC: But we refuse...

JP: Yeah, you know, it's like - C'mon dude, we wanna do our new shit. (In a aggressive voice...) C'mon, get into it! (All Laughing)

KJ: We're not into nostalgia. That stuff is just done, and it's not so much that we don't like those songs, it's just...

SC: It's not the band...

KJ: Yeah, it's not this band.

SC: It was a previous incarnation of this band.

JP: We don't even sell those records with us or anything.

WC: You talked about Seattle earlier with all the different genres going on. When I think of Seattle, some things that come into my mind are; good old school bands, grunge, and coffee. I've never been to Seattle in my life. I was just curious about the metal scene out there in general, what's it like these days?

JP: Actually it's coming back really big. There's Seattle metal online, there's tons of bands. The place we practice at, a lot of the bands play there and stuff now, but it's so wide, there's so many suburbs around Seattle where all these bands come from and whatnot, but Seattle has always had a great scene. We have Nevermore of course, Metal Church, Forced Entry, like I said before The Accused...

SC: The thing is with Seattle it's always been such a mixed scene, you know? For every good band, there's ten shitty bands, whatever...

KJ: Not naming any names. (Laughs)

SC: Not naming any names, I'm just saying there's a lot of shitty bands, but at the same time the scene is so mixed, you'll have a metal band, you'll have a hardcore band, you'll have a punk rock band, and no one gives a fuck, that's just how Seattle is, because this is a really diverse musical culture...

JP: And you'll see that the crowd will be diverse. It'll be crust kids, punk rock kids, mohawks and shit, you know, just a big mix. That's why I've always loved it, you know what I mean? I think that shows in what we do, but there's always good stuff coming out. Seattle's an exciting scene, it's always building off each other, and whatnot, a really awesome community.

SC: It's also a strange microcosm, because it's so far removed from the rest of the country, that any band has to drive sixteen fuckin' hours to play anywhere, except for Portland and Vancouver, otherwise your stuck in Seattle. So because of that, that's why the scene is so melted, it's like everything is so stuck together, because it's so fuckin' far away from everything else. Geography plays a really big part in it. Bands that come from Orange County, L.A., New York, or whatever, they have an instant scene, they just play shows, people like them already...

JP: You drive two hours, and your in another city, you know, any direction...

SC: And you can play for a whole different crowd of kids, you know? Whereas Seattle... you play Seattle, you play Portland, you play Vancouver, and that's all you got. (Laughs) ...

JP: And if you do play home, you can only play like once a month, because kids will get sick of you, you know what I mean? It's crazy, but it's a lot better then how it used to be, because tons of bands come through town, the clubs do a lot of all ages shows and stuff, there's a lot of clubs going on now, where there used to be none. So the way it is now, is fuckin' great

WC: Let me ask you guys this, the metal scene right now is huge. What's your view on the metal scene right now as a whole? Do you feel the scene is over crowded with bands? and Where does Himsa fit into this scene?

SC: You know, every genre of music has ten thousand bands, and five of them people like. (Laughs) You know what I'm saying? That's how it works, and I don't think anyone in this band cares, you know? We've played metal shows, we've also played hardcore shows, we've played punk shows, and nobody gives a fuck, we're a band, you know... we play music. It's just like the eighties, there were ten thousand fuckin' eighties metal bands, ten of them people liked...

JP: Ten survived...

SC: Yeah, ten survived, and the rest gone into the abyss of...

WC: Obscurity...

KJ: And a lot of those bands were good too...

SC: And that's how it is with metal today, it's the same thing, there's fuckin' thousands of bands, and ten that people know. That's how it's always going to be.

CD: It's huge right now, because everyone's dating themselves by throwing in breakdowns and singing parts. I kind of feel like we could have a little longevity to the band, because we do our own thing, and we're not following what everybody else does. So hopefully five years from now, you'll still see us when the scene is died out, you know?

SC: It's not that we don't like the singing stuff... Fuck, me and Kirby were listening to fuckin' Kansas the other night, while we were driving the van. We like the singing shit, but it's just like... I mean bands like Pantera for instance never dated themselves, they always sound like fuckin' Pantera, you can listen to them any year, and it's like ten years ago. Sepultura old stuff, same exact thing, Slayer the same thing, bands have a sound, they stuck with it, and that's how it goes. A lot of these bands, they have a sound, then they start putting shit in it that's contemporary right now, because people want to hear it, like the singing parts, and the breakdowns,and we don't want to compromise our stuff, because we like being pissed off...

KJ: That's the major thing, I think we come from a metal background where metal is supposed to be pissed off, you know? It can be catchy, it can be very musical, and it can be fun, but it's supposed to be pissed off...

SC: There's no emotion happening ever. (Laughs)


KJ: Not that the singing shit is bad, it's just not for us...

JP: It's overkill...It seems like there's so many bands, even starting now that are trying to fit a format to sell, you know what I mean? You definitely see the major markets picking up on this, but the bands that are really standing out right now have a uniqueness to them. We don't follow a certain line on how to do things, we do it how we wanna do it, and if kids like it, awesome, if they don't we don't fuckin' care, because we like it.

How long have we been doing this? two and a half years later... or even since we met you, (points to my friend Scott, who was able to set up this interview for me...thanks again man.) we've reached a certain point, which we thought we never would get to. Every tour is better and better, we see familar faces, and obviously we know were doing right, but it's a slow process, were pretty humble with it, and we take it in stride day by day...

SC: Stick to your guns, you know? I mean fuck, when that first record came out, when we started playing dual guitar solos in every fuckin' song, and kids were like - What the fuck do we do now? We had a mosh part with a guitar solo over it, and the kids were like - Uhh... I don't know what to do, and they hated us...

JP: It's funny, because being that I'm such an old fart, I hear breakdown parts, or mosh parts if you would like to call them that, in almost every song, you know what I mean? It's just a different style, or another way. Kids today they know... it's like their waiting for that part, you can see it in their eyes, they're waiting to take off. It's funny to watch. The crowd will stand still til that part comes, then it goes fuckin' ape shit, and then it stops. For me personally it was from the first song to the last song, you went fuckin' crazy, whether you were circle pitin', fuckin' jumpin' off the fuckin' stage, whatever, it was about getting out there. It wasn't just to be there for those breakdowns.

SC: Yeah, we love the circle pits...

WC: Hell, yeah, old school...

KJ: It's gotta come back...

JP: And without being called for. That's one thing I don't like, when you gotta call for it, it's just gotta happen...

KJ: We want circle pits to just happen, and the lighters have to go up into the air...

SC: And headbanging...

KJ: Yeah. (Laughs)

WC: Do you guys have any Spinal Tap moments from any tours you've done past or present?

KJ: Last night Derek fell through a hole in the stage, his leg all the way up to his fuckin' crotch. That's probably one. (Laughs)

JP: He just disappeared. There was like a two foot space... From where the stage was, they had these sub-monitors out, and there was a two feet space between the stage monitors, it was in the middle, kind of where I'm roaming around and whatnot. So if I went over to pass the monitors, I'd have to kind of hop over to the other side. Derek didn't see it, and he just went shoomp... and all you saw was the front of the crowd, their heads go... (Demonstrates by reenacting the crowd looking up at the stage, then suddenly looking down when Derek fell through the hole.)

WC: What city did that happen in?

CD: Chicago...

JP: No, outside Chicago, The Pearl Room...

SC: In Mokena, Illinois.

WC: What are your future plans for the months ahead?

KJ: Release this new record, which is all done, and then tour. (Record should be out by the time you read this... Joe who?) That's really about it. We just want this record to come out, and then our plan is to do another record right away. Writing is a fun part of this band, you know? There's no real big secret thing we got planned, just tour and write music.

WC: Any bands lined up for the tours you've got coming up? I heard a rumor that you guys and 3 Inches Of Blood are going out on a tour...

KJ: Fuck yeah...

SC: That would be awesome...

JP: We'll go out with them anytime. We always talk about it, but it's just the scheduling. They're either doing something, or we're doing something, you know, it's crazy. As many times as we can play with them, we will, just because we love hanging out with them, they're just a bunch of fuckin' characters. We're doing a tour at the end of September to the begining of november, it's the Danzing / Doyle tour. I guess it would be the "Blackest Of The Black 2" maybe or something. Yeah, it's gonna be; Agony Scene, Mortiis, us, Behemoth, Chimaira, and Danzig with Doyle. We heard and we were like - Fuck...

KJ: We all shit our pants pretty much...

JP: Yeah, it's like a dream come true, you know?

SC: Even if he is a prick!

KJ: (Laughs)

SC: Now he's gonna kick my ass!

WC: So Danzig would be your dream tour?

CD: Yeah, pretty much.

SC: I don't know...I could say (mumbles...) Motley Crue...

WC: Motley Crue?

SC: But that's not... we're talking dream tour...

CD: Yeah, he said dream tour.

WC: (Laughing)

KJ: When I think dream tour, I think of some of the bands we've been out with, and had so much fun with. For me, it would be fun to go out with them (3 Inches Of Blood...) again. Even if the bill dosen't necessarily fit... not that we've based our touring on that, but the Sworn Enemy guys are just a fuckin' tv show waiting to happen...

CD: Whoever gets them a reality show is gonna be rich...

KJ: Yeah, and As I Lay Dying are just the coolest guys ever, 3 Inches Of Blood are awesome guys... I mean yes, put Slayer on there too! (Laughs) For us the dream tours are just having fun hanging out with friends, you know? That's about it.

JP: I would like to see a tour of the most diverse and aggressive bands all on one show, you know? Us playing with; Mastodon, High On Fire, Neurosis, you know, something that was just like how the first starting of Ozzfest was, where each band... it was like; Pantera, Neurosis, Ozzy, you know, something like that...

WC: I know what your saying, bands like; Shadows Fall, Lamb Of God, the new breed of metal stuff...

JP: Exactly, each band has it's own thing, but a really fuckin' aggressive, angry, depressive tour. Just to pull everyone out, and...

SC: Kick their ass...

JP: Yeah, just a huge fuckin' brawl going on, you know what I mean? Fuckin' insanity, on the floor...

WC: Let the bodies hit the floor...

JP: Yeah, exactly.

WC: Thank you so much for your time guys. Do you have any final words for your fans out there?

JP: Thanks for the support, you're the reason why we do this, and are able to do this. Check out the new record, check out himsa.org, write us...

KJ: Come see us play live, say "hi", and buy us a drink! (Laughs)

SC: Or three!

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Himsa's Official Website